Arthritic inflammation and pain respond to Cannabis Medicine

U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 53 million Americans have arthritis, (1) with women making up 60 percent of the arthritis diagnoses. In this blog, I will characterize arthritis and describe how conventional medicine treats it (Section A) and follow up with an analysis on how holistic and cannabis medicine can help arthritis patients. (Section B).

SECTION A
ARTHRITIS

“Arthritis” is an umbrella term used to describe 200 rheumatic diseases affecting the joints and their surrounding tissues. It causes inflammation and stiffness that develops abruptly or gradually around one or more joints. There are two general categories of arthritis: one is an auto-immune diseased called rhematoid arthritis and the second one is called osteoarthritis.

Although more common in seniors, arthritis can severely impair a person of any age, leaving him or her unable to work or perform daily duties. In the United States, arthritis is the most common cause of disability, and high levels of stress and depression are often associated.

 

In terms of causation, conventional medicine as usual characterizes this disease as idiosyncratic, meaning no know causes. However, en ensemble of genetics, infenctions, toxicity, uric acid, oxalic acide, leaky gut syndrome, an alterned immune and inflammatory system. physical trauma and other lifestly factors have been attributed.

 

Arthritis is an uncomfortable and often unavoidable disease that often results in severe symptoms:
• Injuries that don’t heal properly
• Carpal tunnel syndrome and peripheral neuropathies (tingling or numbness in extremities)
• Plantar fasciitis (inflammation of the forefoot)
• Persistent joint pain
• Locked joints
• Morning stiffness

 

Forms of arthritis are broken into seven main categories:

1 Inflammatory arthritis — joints become inflamed for no apparent reason.
2 Degenerative or mechanical arthritis — the body tries remodeling the bone to restore stability. Osteoarthritis is an example.
3 Soft tissue musculoskeletal pain — pain felt in tissues rather than joints or bones, affecting overused body parts. For example, “tennis elbow.”
4 Back pain — unspecified pain associated with muscles, discs, nerves, ligaments, bones, or joints in the back such as osteoporosis.
5 Connective tissue disease — pain in tendons, ligaments, and cartilage characterized by inflammation of the skin, muscles, lungs, and kidneys.
6 Infectious arthritis — inflammation in a joint caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi (examples of causes include food poisoning, STDs, and Hepatitis C). Antibiotics can usually treat it.
7 Metabolic arthritis — too much uric acid may form sharp crystals in a joint that cause sudden, excruciating pain. Gout is an example.

Arthritis Treatment Methods

Although they don’t heal joint inflammation, analgesics like Tylenol, Percocet, and Vicodin may be prescribed to reduce pain along with creams containing menthol or capsaicin. Over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like Advil, Motrin, or Aleve may be taken to reduce pain and inflammation.

Rheumatoid arthritis is treated with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) to prevent the immune system from attacking inflamed joints. Corticosteroids like prednisone and cortisone may also be prescribed to reduce inflammation and suppress the immune system.

Exercise can ease pain and stress levels for people with arthritis, but nearly a quarter of adults diagnosed with arthritis report being physically inactive. Dietary changes may manage arthritis, as meats and foods high in sugar can exacerbate inflammation. (2)

SECTION B

How Cannabis Can Help Arthritis

While cannabis is classified as a Schedule I drug by the federal government, meaning it’s considered highly addictive with no medical value and research on it is severely restricted — a scientific consensus has nevertheless emerged on its therapeutic value based on a growing body of successful preclinical and clinical trials. To the delight of many, those studies show that cannabis has anti-inflammatory effects that can help arthritis patients live happier, healthier lives.

Consequently, cannabis is gaining popularity as a treatment for arthritis. Cannabis can ease pain and reduce swelling without the potentially life-threatening side effects caused by frequent NSAID or opiate use.

 

In the summer of 2015, the Canadian Arthritis Society funded a three-year research grant to a Dalhousie University researcher to determine if marijuana can relieve pain or repair arthritic joints. Pain-detecting nerves are filled with cannabinoid receptors, and according to researcher Jason McDougall, cannabinoids control the firing of pain signals from the joint to the brain by sticking themselves to nerve receptors.

These findings indicate that activation of peripheral CB1 receptors reduces the mechanosensitivity of afferent nerve fibers in control and OA knee joints. Blockade of either the CB1 receptor or the TRPV-1 channel significantly reduced the efficacy of ACEA, which suggests that both receptors are involved in cannabinoid-mediated antinociception. The increased nerve activity observed following CB1 receptor antagonism suggests a tonic release of endocannabinoids during OA. As such, peripheral CB1 receptors may be important targets in controlling OA pain.

 

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.23156/full

(3)

 

Another controlled study, conducted by the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Disease in the UK, showed that cannabinoids provided statistically significant improvements in pain on movement, pain at rest, and quality of sleep.

 

Conclusions. In the first ever controlled trial of a CBM in RA, a significant analgesic effect was observed and disease activity was significantly suppressed following Sativex treatment. Whilst the differences are small and variable across the population, they represent benefits of clinical relevance and show the need for more detailed investigation in this indication.

(4)

 

CONCLUSION

At a time when opiate abuse has reached epidemic proportions, cannabis treatment can be a far less harmful and less addictive way to treat those suffering from chronic pain associated with arthritis. According to Mike Hart, MD, head physician of the Ontario Chapter at Marijuana for Trauma (MFT):

“Cannabis is much more effective and safer long term solution than opioids. The science is clear and demonstrates that cannabis is far safer than opioids. In fact, it’s not even close. Opioids have killed more people than all illegal drugs combined, while cannabis has never killed a single person.”

Not only is cannabis an effective alternative treatment to NSAIDs or opiates, it can help people get off dangerous drugs such as opioids. According to Dr. Hart, “I have literally helped hundreds of patients reduce or eliminate their dependence on opioids.”

www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/pdf/hhs_prescription_drug_abuse_report_09.2013.pd

 

. As far back as 2004, the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), which boasts 35 million members, published a national poll revealing that 72 percent of seniors support allowing the use of doctor-recommended cannabis to treat patients.

 

www.safeaccessnow.org/arthritis_booklet

 

PRECISION AND REFERENCE NOTES.

www.cdc.gov/arthritis/data_statistics/arthritis-related-stats.htm

(2)onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.20057/full

 

(3) study

 

 

(4) study Preliminary assessment of the efficacy, tolerability and safety of a cannabis-based medicine (Sativex) in the treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis
D. R. Blake P. Robson M. Ho R. W. Jubb C. S. McCabe
Rheumatology (Oxford) (2006) 45 (1): 50-52. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kei183
Published: 09 November

 

(5)
www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/pdf/hhs_prescription_drug_abuse_report_09.2013.pdf

 

 

 

These findings indicate that activation of peripheral CB1 receptors reduces the mechanosensitivity of afferent nerve fibers in control and OA knee joints. Blockade of either the CB1 receptor or the TRPV-1 channel significantly reduced the efficacy of ACEA, which suggests that both receptors are involved in cannabinoid-mediated antinociception. The increased nerve activity observed following CB1 receptor antagonism suggests a tonic release of endocannabinoids during OA. As such, peripheral CB1 receptors may be important targets in controlling OA pain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cannabis and Arthritis

U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 53 million Americans have arthritis, (1) with women making up 60 percent of the arthritis diagnoses. In this blog, I will characterize arthritis and describe how conventional medicine treats it (Section A) and follow up with an analysis on how holistic and cannabis medicine can help arthritis patients. (Section B).

SECTION A
ARTHRITIS

“Arthritis” is an umbrella term used to describe 200 rheumatic diseases affecting the joints and their surrounding tissues. It causes inflammation and stiffness that develops abruptly or gradually around one or more joints. There are two general categories of arthritis: one is an auto-immune diseased called rhematoid arthritis and the second one is called osteoarthritis.

Although more common in seniors, arthritis can severely impair a person of any age, leaving him or her unable to work or perform daily duties. In the United States, arthritis is the most common cause of disability, and high levels of stress and depression are often associated.

 

In terms of causation, conventional medicine as usual characterizes this disease as idiosyncratic, meaning no know causes. However, en ensemble of genetics, infenctions, toxicity, uric acid, oxalic acide, leaky gut syndrome, an alterned immune and inflammatory system. physical trauma and other lifestly factors have been attributed.

Forms of arthritis are broken into seven main categories:

1 Inflammatory arthritis — joints become inflamed for no apparent reason.
2 Degenerative or mechanical arthritis — the body tries remodeling the bone to restore stability. Osteoarthritis is an example.
3 Soft tissue musculoskeletal pain — pain felt in tissues rather than joints or bones, affecting overused body parts. For example, “tennis elbow.”
4 Back pain — unspecified pain associated with muscles, discs, nerves, ligaments, bones, or joints in the back such as osteoporosis.
5 Connective tissue disease — pain in tendons, ligaments, and cartilage characterized by inflammation of the skin, muscles, lungs, and kidneys.
6 Infectious arthritis — inflammation in a joint caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi (examples of causes include food poisoning, STDs, and Hepatitis C). Antibiotics can usually treat it.
7 Metabolic arthritis — too much uric acid may form sharp crystals in a joint that cause sudden, excruciating pain. Gout is an example.

Arthritis Treatment Methods

Although they don’t heal joint inflammation, analgesics like Tylenol, Percocet, and Vicodin may be prescribed to reduce pain along with creams containing menthol or capsaicin. Over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like Advil, Motrin, or Aleve may be taken to reduce pain and inflammation.

Rheumatoid arthritis is treated with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) to prevent the immune system from attacking inflamed joints. Corticosteroids like prednisone and cortisone may also be prescribed to reduce inflammation and suppress the immune system.

Exercise can ease pain and stress levels for people with arthritis, but nearly a quarter of adults diagnosed with arthritis report being physically inactive. Dietary changes may manage arthritis, as meats and foods high in sugar can exacerbate inflammation. (2)

SECTION B

How Cannabis Can Help Arthritis

While cannabis is classified as a Schedule I drug by the federal government, meaning it’s considered highly addictive with no medical value and research on it is severely restricted — a scientific consensus has nevertheless emerged on its therapeutic value based on a growing body of successful preclinical and clinical trials. To the delight of many, those studies show that cannabis has anti-inflammatory effects that can help arthritis patients live happier, healthier lives.

Consequently, cannabis is gaining popularity as a treatment for arthritis. Cannabis can ease pain and reduce swelling without the potentially life-threatening side effects caused by frequent NSAID or opiate use.

 

In the summer of 2015, the Canadian Arthritis Society funded a three-year research grant to a Dalhousie University researcher to determine if marijuana can relieve pain or repair arthritic joints. Pain-detecting nerves are filled with cannabinoid receptors, and according to researcher Jason McDougall, cannabinoids control the firing of pain signals from the joint to the brain by sticking themselves to nerve receptors.

These findings indicate that activation of peripheral CB1 receptors reduces the mechanosensitivity of afferent nerve fibers in control and OA knee joints. Blockade of either the CB1 receptor or the TRPV-1 channel significantly reduced the efficacy of ACEA, which suggests that both receptors are involved in cannabinoid-mediated antinociception. The increased nerve activity observed following CB1 receptor antagonism suggests a tonic release of endocannabinoids during OA. As such, peripheral CB1 receptors may be important targets in controlling OA pain.

 

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.23156/full

(3)

 

Another controlled study, conducted by the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Disease in the UK, showed that cannabinoids provided statistically significant improvements in pain on movement, pain at rest, and quality of sleep.

 

Conclusions. In the first ever controlled trial of a CBM in RA, a significant analgesic effect was observed and disease activity was significantly suppressed following Sativex treatment. Whilst the differences are small and variable across the population, they represent benefits of clinical relevance and show the need for more detailed investigation in this indication.

(4)

 

CONCLUSION

At a time when opiate abuse has reached epidemic proportions, cannabis treatment can be a far less harmful and less addictive way to treat those suffering from chronic pain associated with arthritis. According to Mike Hart, MD, head physician of the Ontario Chapter at Marijuana for Trauma (MFT):

“Cannabis is much more effective and safer long term solution than opioids. The science is clear and demonstrates that cannabis is far safer than opioids. In fact, it’s not even close. Opioids have killed more people than all illegal drugs combined, while cannabis has never killed a single person.”

Not only is cannabis an effective alternative treatment to NSAIDs or opiates, it can help people get off dangerous drugs such as opioids. According to Dr. Hart, “I have literally helped hundreds of patients reduce or eliminate their dependence on opioids.”

www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/pdf/hhs_prescription_drug_abuse_report_09.2013.pd

 

. As far back as 2004, the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), which boasts 35 million members, published a national poll revealing that 72 percent of seniors support allowing the use of doctor-recommended cannabis to treat patients.

 

www.safeaccessnow.org/arthritis_booklet

 

PRECISION AND REFERENCE NOTES.

www.cdc.gov/arthritis/data_statistics/arthritis-related-stats.htm

(2)onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.20057/full

 

(3) study

 

 

(4) study Preliminary assessment of the efficacy, tolerability and safety of a cannabis-based medicine (Sativex) in the treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis
D. R. Blake P. Robson M. Ho R. W. Jubb C. S. McCabe
Rheumatology (Oxford) (2006) 45 (1): 50-52. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kei183
Published: 09 November

 

(5)
www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/pdf/hhs_prescription_drug_abuse_report_09.2013.pdf

 

 

 

These findings indicate that activation of peripheral CB1 receptors reduces the mechanosensitivity of afferent nerve fibers in control and OA knee joints. Blockade of either the CB1 receptor or the TRPV-1 channel significantly reduced the efficacy of ACEA, which suggests that both receptors are involved in cannabinoid-mediated antinociception. The increased nerve activity observed following CB1 receptor antagonism suggests a tonic release of endocannabinoids during OA. As such, peripheral CB1 receptors may be important targets in controlling OA pain.

 

 

 

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